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Thursday, November 26 • 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Disruptive Technologies / Les technologies perturbatrices

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Organized by Ryerson University VP- Research and Innovation, 

Disruptive technologies challenge existing business models – creating entirely new industries (think google) and destroying or transforming entire industries (think encyclopedia Britannica, think travel agents). A recent study by McKinsey outlined predicted dramatic impacts of technologies such as mobile, robotics, big data, and 3 D on virtually every sector. Another study by Fey and Osbourne The future of computerization concluded 47% of jobs in North America are at risk. Currently Canadian business under-investments in technologies contribute to the productivity gap, and it is not because the technologies are not available. Canada leads the world in consumer use of mobile technologies but corporate adoption of mobile has lagged. A recent study by the government of Ontario showed Small Medium Enterprises were generally laggards in the use of ecommerce. Electronic health records, have been promising to transform health care since the 1980’s but the impediments to use are systemic. To date, Canada’s innovation strategy has focused largely on the supply side – on research and development and commercialization of new technologies in the hopes that they will drive improvements in productivity, economic growth and quality of life. But increasingly the evidence is that we need to also focus on the demand for these technologies, for the factors shaping individual and organizational behavior that drive or impede their adoption. This panel will explore what the future holds with emerging technologies, their potential impacts, what factors shape their adoption and the implications for policy.
Disruptive technologies challenge existing business models – creating entirely new industries (think google) and destroying or transforming entire industries (think encyclopedia Britannica, think travel agents). A recent study by McKinsey outlined predicted dramatic impacts of technologies such as mobile, robotics, big data, and 3 D on virtually every sector. Another study by Fey and Osbourne The future of computerization concluded 47% of jobs in North America are at risk. Currently Canadian business under-investments in technologies contribute to the productivity gap, and it is not because the technologies are not available. Canada leads the world in consumer use of mobile technologies but corporate adoption of mobile has lagged. A recent study by the government of Ontario showed Small Medium Enterprises were generally laggards in the use of ecommerce. Electronic health records, have been promising to transform health care since the 1980’s but the impediments to use are systemic. To date, Canada’s innovation strategy has focused largely on the supply side – on research and development and commercialization of new technologies in the hopes that they will drive improvements in productivity, economic growth and quality of life. But increasingly the evidence is that we need to also focus on the demand for these technologies, for the factors shaping individual and organizational behavior that drive or impede their adoption. This panel will explore what the future holds with emerging technologies, their potential impacts, what factors shape their adoption and the implications for policy.


Moderators
avatar for Wendy Cukier

Wendy Cukier

Vice-President Research and Innovation, Ryerson University
Wendy Cukier, as Vice-President of Research and Innovation at Ryerson University, leads the strategy to grow research and to promote innovation and commercialization.  Under her leadership, Ryerson has expanded its multi stakeholder collaborations and research funding has grown by 40% in the past two years alone. Previously, she was the Associate Dean of the Ted Rogers School of Management, Canada’s largest business school. She has... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Chretien

Michelle Chretien

Program Manager, Strategic Research, Xerox Research Centre
Michelle Chrétien joined the Xerox Research Centre of Canada (XRCC) in 2007 is currently Program Manager for Strategic Research as well as the Product Manager for Electronic Materials.  Michelle leads a group focused on fundamental and applied materials science and is responsible for the design and characterization of materials for both Xerox Corporation and external clients.  Her group is also active in the fabrication and... Read More →
avatar for Mohamed Elmi

Mohamed Elmi

PhD student / Research Associate, Information Systems at University of Cape Town / Ted Rogers School of Management’s Diversity Institute
Mohamed Elmi is a PhD student in Information Systems at University of Cape Town and a Research Associate with the Ted Rogers School of Management’s Diversity Institute at Ryerson University. | Mohamed’s doctoral research focuses on how Information Communication Technologies can further economic and social development in African countries. As part of his research, Mohamed looks at how ICTs is used within communities that lack a defined... Read More →
avatar for Martin Lavoie

Martin Lavoie

Director, Innovation, Canadian Manufacturers Association
Martin Lavoie is currently Director of policy for the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME), Canada’s largest trade and business association representing over 10,000 businesses across the country. Martin is primarily responsible for the elaboration of policy positions that relate to innovation and public and R&D, business taxation and government procurements. Previously, Martin worked in government relations for private... Read More →
avatar for Colin Mckay

Colin Mckay

Head, Public Policy and Government Relations, Google Canada
Colin is the Head of Google's Public Policy and Government Relations team in Canada. | Colin is a member of the board at MediaSmarts, a not-for-profit organization that provides youth with critical thinking skills to engage with media as active and informed digital citizens, and is a member of the Government of Canada Advisory Panel on Open Government, as well as sitting on the boards of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association, the... Read More →


Thursday November 26, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Richelieu (level C)

Attendees (29)




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